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Items where Author is "Carrigan, Mark"

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Stürmer, Milan and Carrigan, Mark (2023) Resisting AI: an anti-fascist approach to Artificial Intelligence - review. LSE Review of Books (17 Oct 2023). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2023) Superficial engagement with generative AI masks its potential contribution as an academic interlocuter. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (29 Aug 2023). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark and Stürmer, Milan (2023) Book review: The influencer industry: the quest for authenticity on social media. LSE Review of Books (07 Aug 2023). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2023) Are universities too slow to cope with generative AI? Impact of Social Sciences Blog (27 Apr 2023). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2023) Social media has changed – will academics catch up? Impact of Social Sciences Blog (14 Apr 2023). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2023) Generative AI and the unceasing acceleration of academic writing. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (14 Mar 2023). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2022) An introvert’s guide to academic networking and hybrid events. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (15 Sep 2022). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2022) Academics should embrace Lo-Fi podcasting. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (13 Jul 2022). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2022) Leave, adapt, resist – time to rethink academic Twitter? Impact of Social Sciences Blog (03 May 2022). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2022) Are personal academic blogs a thing of the past? Impact of Social Sciences Blog (11 Apr 2022). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2022) An audible university? The emerging role of podcasts, audiobooks and text to speech technology in research should be taken seriously. LSE Review of Books (07 Jan 2022). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2021) An audible university? The emerging role of podcasts, audiobooks and text to speech technology in research should be taken seriously. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (17 Dec 2021). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2021) Is hybrid a desirable ‘new normal’ for academic events? Impact of Social Sciences Blog (28 Oct 2021). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark and Fatsis, Lambros (2021) The epistemological chaos of platform capitalism and the future of the social sciences. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (10 Jun 2021). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark and Canhoto, Ana (2020) Equipping PhD researchers for social media success. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (07 Nov 2020). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2020) Will we still have offices in the post-pandemic university? LSE Review of Books (12 Jun 2020). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2020) Are we all digital scholars now? How the lockdown will reshape the post-pandemic digital structure of academia. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (10 Apr 2020). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2019) From hermits to celebrities - how social media is reshaping academic hierarchies and what we can do about it. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (16 Dec 2019). Blog Entry.

Carrigan, Mark (2019) Why I've deleted my Twitter account #exhaustionrebellion by Mark Carrigan. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (06 Dec 2019). Blog Entry.

Jordan, Katy and Carrigan, Mark (2018) How was social media cited in 2014 REF Impact Case Studies? Impact of Social Sciences Blog (06 Jun 2018). Website.

Jordan, Katy and Carrigan, Mark (2018) The impact agenda has led to social media being used in a role it may not be equipped to perform. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (31 May 2018). Website.

Uprichard, Emma and Carrigan, Mark (2015) Emma Uprichard: most big data is social data – the analytics need serious interrogation. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (12 Feb 2015). Blog Entry.

Leonelli, Sabina and Carrigan, Mark (2015) Sabina Leonelli: What constitutes trustworthy data changes across time and space. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (19 Jan 2015). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2014) Noortje Marres: Technology and culture are becoming more and more entangled. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (03 Dec 2014). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2014) Book review: media technologies: essays on communication, materiality, and society edited by Tarleton Gillespie, Pablo J. Boczkowski and Kirsten A. Foot. LSE Review of Books (22 Nov 2014). Website.

Halford, Susan and Carrigan, Mark (2014) Susan Halford: “Semantic web innovations are likely to have implications for us all”. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (18 Jul 2014). Website.

Carrigan, Mark and Lupton, Deborah (2014) Deborah Lupton: Liquid metaphors for Big Data seek to familiarise technology. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (11 Jul 2014). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2014) Evelyn Ruppert: “Social consequences of Big Data are not being attended to”. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (03 Jul 2014). Website.

Carrigan, Mark and Kitchin, Rob (2014) Rob Kitchin: “Big data should complement small data, not replace them.”. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (27 Jun 2014). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2014) Book review: what is a social movement? by Hank Johnston. LSE Review of Books (18 Jun 2014). Website.

Carrigan, Mark and Fuller, Steve (2014) Five minutes with Steve Fuller: “The best teachers are like the best jazz artists – drawing on multiple texts simultaneously”. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (16 May 2014). Website.

Carrigan, Mark and Mahony, Nick (2013) A critical social science will help inform and shape the wider debate around public engagement. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (03 Dec 2013). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2013) Five minutes with John Holmwood and Sue Scott: “Discover Society puts social research back at the heart of public debate.”. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (04 Oct 2013). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2013) 5 Minutes with Professor Rachel Pain: “Research capacity is our greatest resource, and collaboration at any level has the potential to make for excellent research”. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (11 Feb 2013). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2013) 5 Minutes with Kip Jones: “we engage in the creative process and open new doors for communication”. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (01 Feb 2013). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2013) Book review: Think tanks in America. LSE Review of Books (31 Jan 2013). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2012) What about the authors who can’t pay? Why the government’s embrace of gold open access isn’t something to celebrate. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (17 Jul 2012). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2012) A researcher’s survival guide to information overload and curation tools. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (16 Jul 2012). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2012) Do ‘prestigious’ journals make academics lazy? An unlikely parallel with the art world. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (09 Jul 2012). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2012) Podcasts are a natural fit for communication of academic ideas. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (10 May 2012). Website.

Carrigan, Mark (2012) Support, engagement, visibility and personalised news: Twitter has a lot to offer academics if we look past its image problem. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (16 Feb 2012). Website.

Lockley, Pat and Carrigan, Mark (2011) Continual publishing across journals, blogs and social media maximises impact by increasing the size of the ‘academic footprint'. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (26 Oct 2011). Website.

Lockley, Pat and Carrigan, Mark (2011) The search for the academic arctic monkey: why we must maximise the exposure of research through a blend of traditional and new methods of publication. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (19 Sep 2011). Website.

Lockley, Pat and Carrigan, Mark (2011) Cite or Site? The current view of what constitutes ‘academic publishing’ is too limited. Our published work must become truly public. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (01 Sep 2011). Website.

This list was generated on Sun May 26 15:36:44 2024 BST.