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Do higher wages come at a price?

Bryson, Alex, Barth, Erling and Dale-Olsen, Harald (2012) Do higher wages come at a price? Journal of Economic Psychology, 33 (1). pp. 251-263. ISSN 0167-4870

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Abstract

Using linked employer–employee data for Britain we find that higher wages are associated with higher job satisfaction and higher job anxiety. The association between wages and non-pecuniary job satisfaction disappears with the inclusion of effort measures whereas the positive association between wages and job anxiety remains strong and significant providing no support for a compensating differential explanation, but rather for a ‘gift exchange’ type of reciprocal behaviour. No support is found for the proposition that within-workplace wage differentials are a source of job anxiety.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-econom...
Additional Information: © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
Library of Congress subject classification: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Journal of Economic Literature Classification System: J - Labor and Demographic Economics > J3 - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs > J31 - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials by Skill, Training, Occupation, etc.
J - Labor and Demographic Economics > J8 - Labor Standards: National and International > J81 - Working Conditions
Sets: Research centres and groups > Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)
Rights: http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/usingTheLibrary/academicSupport/OA/depositYourResearch.aspx
Date Deposited: 29 Aug 2012 13:51
URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/45627/

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