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The concept of hedging and its application to Southeast Asia: a critique and a proposal for a modified conceptual and methodological framework

Haacke, Jürgen (2019) The concept of hedging and its application to Southeast Asia: a critique and a proposal for a modified conceptual and methodological framework. International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, 19 (3). pp. 375-417. ISSN 1470-482X

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[img] Text (Concept of hedging and its application to Southeast Asia) - Accepted Version
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Identification Number: 10.1093/irap/lcz010

Abstract

In the context of the complex unipolar post-Cold War period that has witnessed China’s reemergence as an economic and military power, small and middle powers are increasingly considered to be hedging. This analysis is especially prevalent in relation to Southeast Asian countries, many of which face security challenges posed by China. However, as the literature on hedging has expanded, the concept’s analytical value is no longer obvious. Different understandings of hedging compete within the literature, and there are many criteria by which hedging is empirically ascertained, leading to confusion even over the basic question of which countries are hedging. In response, this article presents a modified conceptual and methodological framework that clearly delineates hedging from other security strategies and identifies key criteria to evaluate whether smaller powers are hedging when confronting a serious security challenge by one of the major powers. This framework is then applied to Malaysia and Singapore.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: International Relations
Date Deposited: 04 Jul 2019 10:45
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2020 00:22
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/101120

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