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Items where Author is "Reilly, Paul"

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Reilly, Paul, Veneti, Anastasia and Lilleker, Darren (2020) Violence against journalists is not new, but attacks on those covering #BlackLivesMatter protests is a bad sign for US press freedom. USApp – American Politics and Policy Blog (12 Jun 2020). Blog Entry.

Reilly, Paul (2020) Faced with an ‘infodemic’ of fake news about covid-19, most people are checking their facts – but we mustn’t be complacent. Democratic Audit Blog (20 Apr 2020). Blog Entry.

Reilly, Paul (2020) The fight against coronavirus ‘fake news’ should begin with our political leaders, not just online trolls. Democratic Audit Blog (08 Apr 2020). Blog Entry.

Reilly, Paul and Gordon, Faith (2019) Social media can play a key role in campaigns against paramilitary-style assaults in Northern Ireland. Democratic Audit Blog (09 Jan 2019). Blog Entry.

Reilly, Paul (2018) Local journalists have key role to play in combating ‘fake news’ in Northern Ireland. Democratic Audit Blog (10 Sep 2018). Blog Entry.

Reilly, Paul (2018) Sinn Féin MP’s resignation demonstrates the dangers of social media for politicians. Democratic Audit Blog (26 Jan 2018). Blog Entry.

Reilly, Paul (2016) Contested narratives: social media and policing in Northern Ireland. British Politics and Policy at LSE (02 Nov 2016). Website.

Reilly, Paul (2011) Social media didn’t start the fire: proposals for the temporary shutdown of social media during riots are unlikely to prevent further unrest. British Politics and Policy at LSE (19 Sep 2011). Website.

Reilly, Paul (2011) The internet never forgets: government measures to protect privacy are unlikely to succeed in the social media age. British Politics and Policy at LSE (13 Jul 2011). Website.

This list was generated on Thu Jan 27 16:39:39 2022 GMT.