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The "problem" of predatory publishing remains a relatively small one and should not be allowed to defame open access

Olijhoek, Tom and Tennant, Jon (2018) The "problem" of predatory publishing remains a relatively small one and should not be allowed to defame open access. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (25 Sep 2018). Website.

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Abstract

A recent investigation led by an international group of journalists raised concerns over the scale of the problem of deceptive publishing practices, with many researchers of standing and reputation found to have published in "predatory" journals. However, while the findings of this investigation garnered significant media attention, the robustness of the study itself was not subject to the same scrutiny. To Tom Olijhoek and Jon Tennant, the profile afforded to investigations of this type causes some to overstate the problem of predatory publishing, while often discrediting open access publishing at the same time. The real problem here is one of education around questionable journals, and should not distract from more urgent questions around the shifting scholarly ecosystem.

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2018...
Additional Information: © 2018 The Authors; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
Sets: Collections > Impact of Social Sciences Blog at LSE
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2019 14:22
Last Modified: 12 Dec 2019 01:23
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/91753

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