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A vicious circle of gender bias has meant differences between men's and women's scholarly productivity have not changed since the 1960s

Sandström, Ulf and van den Besselaar, Peter (2018) A vicious circle of gender bias has meant differences between men's and women's scholarly productivity have not changed since the 1960s. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (07 Aug 2018). Website.

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Abstract

Gender differences in scholarly productivity have proved a persistent problem. But to what extent is the situation improving for younger generations of female academics? Ulf Sandström and Peter van den Besselaar report on research showing that overall productivity for female researchers is about two thirds of male productivity, a ratio that had actually already been established by the end of the 1960s and has remained stable ever since. Gender influences female researchers’ academic rank, role in research teams and networks, and likelihood of being awarded funding. This then has a negative effect on their productivity, which in turn reinforces their lower status and position. This vicious circle means career differences will not simply diminish over time.

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2018...
Additional Information: © 2018 The Authors; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
Sets: Collections > Impact of Social Sciences Blog at LSE
Date Deposited: 02 Jan 2019 11:45
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2020 00:23
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/91429

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