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Those who support the presence of Confederate symbols in public spaces in the South tend to have less knowledge of Civil War history, negating a commonly used defense that the emblems represent ‘heritage not hate’

Strother, Logan, Piston, Spencer and Ogorzalek, Thomas (2017) Those who support the presence of Confederate symbols in public spaces in the South tend to have less knowledge of Civil War history, negating a commonly used defense that the emblems represent ‘heritage not hate’. USApp - American Politics and Policy Blog (03 Jul 2017). Website.

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Abstract

The shooting of African-American church goers by white supremacist Dylann Roof reignited a fierce discussion in the American South about the role of Confederate symbols in public spaces. Much of this falls under the ‘hate vs. heritage’ debate; that confederate emblems represent heritage as opposed to racial animosity. Research by Logan Strother, Spencer Piston, and Thomas Ogorzalek finds that those who support the public presence of Confederate emblems tend to have less knowledge of Civil War history, demonstrating that racial prejudice does explain much of the observed support for the Confederate flag, while Southern heritage appears to explain relatively little.

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2017 The Author(s) CC BY-NC 3.0; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
J Political Science > JK Political institutions (United States)
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2017 08:23
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2020 23:30
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/83489

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