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In many poor urban neighborhoods, nonprofits are superseding elected politicians as neighborhood representatives.

Levine, Jeremy (2016) In many poor urban neighborhoods, nonprofits are superseding elected politicians as neighborhood representatives. USApp – American Politics and Policy Blog (07 Nov 2016). Website.

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Abstract

The past five decades have seen community based nonprofit organizations become an integral component of urban policy, a trend which has been accelerated by the growth of public-private partnerships. In new research using fieldwork in Boston, Massachusetts, Jeremy Levine finds that in some poor urban communities, nonprofits are actually taking the place of elected officials as legitimate community representatives. While this move towards private political representation means that urban policymakers need to reconsider how neighborhoods are represented and gain access to resources, they also raise questions of accountability.

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2016 The Authors, USApp – American Politics and Policy Blog, The London School of Economics and Political Science © CC BY-NC 3.0; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
J Political Science > JK Political institutions (United States)
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 27 Jan 2017 12:24
Last Modified: 30 May 2020 23:29
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/69112

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  • In many poor urban neighborhoods, nonprofits are superseding elected politicians as neighborhood representatives. (deposited 27 Jan 2017 12:24) [Currently Displayed]

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