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Lecture recording in higher education: risky business or evolving open practice

Rios-Amaya, Juliana and Secker, Jane and Morrison, Chris (2016) Lecture recording in higher education: risky business or evolving open practice. LSE / University of Kent, London, UK.

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Abstract

Reports on a survey into the copyright and intellectual property (IPR) policies of UK higher education institutions with regards to lecture recording. The practice of using institutional semi-automated lecture recording systems is becoming mainstream with 71% of institutions reporting using it in 2016 (UCISA, 2016). However, these systems raise a number of issues related to copyright and IPR that in some cases are documented in specific policy documents. Issues that arise include the consent that is obtained from academic staff, the ownership of the resulting outputs and responsibility and advice given for the use of third party content in the lectures. These issues are also often linked to, or conflated with wider ethical issues such as identity, privacy and academic freedom. The findings from the survey are presented alongside a policy analysis of IPR documents and policies from 11 institutions. These are compared to the guidance provided by Jisc (2015). The findings from the survey reveal that most institutions are still developing their IPR policy with regards to lecture recording, that many institutions seek consent from lecturers, but there is an increasing move towards making lecture recording opt-out as opposed to opt-in. The survey revealed in 94% of cases the lecturers or presenter is responsible for any third party content contained within their lecture and while institutions do offer advice about dealing with third party content, much of it is delivered in a relatively passive way, through agreeing to use the system or by information made available online in guides. The findings from the policy analysis suggest that those institutions with a high level of institutional control tend to have a higher level of comprehensiveness of approach towards lecture recording. Additionally the institutions that provide a higher level of support for copyright advice, have a tendency towards open practice and higher levels of appetite for risk. Good practice advice for institutions and recommendations for further research are presented as part of this stud

Item Type: Monograph (Report)
Official URL: http://lti.lse.ac.uk/
Additional Information: © 2016 The Authors © CC BY 4.0
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
Sets: Research centres and groups > Learning Technology and Innovation (LTI)
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2016 15:38
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2016 15:39
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/68275

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