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Identifying vulnerable groups in the Kyrgyz labour market: some implications for the national poverty reduction strategy

Bernabe, Sabine and Kolev, Alexandre (2003) Identifying vulnerable groups in the Kyrgyz labour market: some implications for the national poverty reduction strategy. CASEpaper, CASE/71. Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

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Identification Number: CASE/71

Abstract

This paper investigates the overlap between employment status and poverty, drawing particular attention to the working poor and precarious workers, and to the existence of multiple labor-related risks faced by specific groups. This analysis is undertaken using the Kyrgyz Poverty Monitoring Survey, which is the only survey to date that allows a comprehensive analysis of poverty and labor market outcomes in the Kyrgyz Republic. The period under investigation covers the years 1997-1998, for which data are available. A key finding of this analysis is the extreme vulnerability of low-educated people and women in Kyrgyzstan, who cumulated a high risk of being unemployed, of remaining longer in unemployment, of being discouraged, and if employed, of being low-paid or working in precarious jobs.

Item Type: Monograph (Discussion Paper)
Official URL: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/case
Additional Information: © 2003 Sabine Bernabè and Alexandre Kolev
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Sets: Collections > Economists Online
Research centres and groups > Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE)
Date Deposited: 02 Jul 2008 10:58
Last Modified: 22 Jul 2014 08:31
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/6334

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