Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Most Americans are now opposed to laws against interracial marriage, but their behavior does not yet reflect these attitudes

Garcia, Ginny E., Lewis Jr,, Richard and Ford-Robertson, Joanne (2015) Most Americans are now opposed to laws against interracial marriage, but their behavior does not yet reflect these attitudes. USApp – American Politics and Policy Blog (23 Mar 2015). Website.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (162kB) | Preview

Abstract

Recent decades have seen a dramatic fall in the number of people that support laws which prohibit interracial marriages, and an increase in the number of these marriages. But why does the rate of interracial marriages remain so low, when compared to same-race marriages? Using national data from the past three decades, Ginny E. Garcia, Richard Lewis Jr., and Joanne Ford-Robertson show that while attitudes towards interracial marriages have changed, many groups still have negative attitudes towards Black-White unions. They find that those who perceive social and economic competition with Blacks, such as those with lower levels of education, were more likely to support laws that prohibit interracial marriages and engage in behaviors that prevent Black’s wider participation in society.

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2015 The Authors, USApp – American Politics and Policy Blog, The London School of Economics and Political Science.; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: J Political Science > JK Political institutions (United States)
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2015 13:41
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2020 23:45
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/61713

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics