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Those who believe hard work determines who gets ahead are less likely to support preferential hiring for women and African Americans

Wilkins, Vicky and Wenger, Jeffrey (2014) Those who believe hard work determines who gets ahead are less likely to support preferential hiring for women and African Americans. LSE American Politics and Policy (17 Sep 2014). Website.

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Abstract

Much conservative ideology is underpinned by the idea that in a just world, people should get what they deserve through hard work and opportunity. But if the world is not a just one, does people’s understanding of deservingness influence their support for government and its policies? Using results of the General Social Survey from between 1994 and 2006, Vicky Wilkins and Jeffrey Wenger find that individuals’ beliefs about deservingness influence the public’s support for particular policies, including affirmative action. They write that those who believe that luck is the most important determinant of getting ahead are more likely to support hiring preferences for women and African Americans, whereas those who believe hard work is the key are less likely to support preferential hiring.

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2014 The Authors; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
J Political Science > JK Political institutions (United States)
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2014 13:38
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2019 19:28
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/59859

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