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The invisibility of undocumented migrants in 9/11 relief and commemoration is a symptom of their wider social and political isolation

Délano, Alexandra and Nienass, Benjamin (2014) The invisibility of undocumented migrants in 9/11 relief and commemoration is a symptom of their wider social and political isolation. LSE American Politics and Policy (08 Sep 2014). Blog Entry.

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Abstract

Despite their lack of recognition, undocumented immigrants are not immune from the disasters and tragedies that occur in the U.S. The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2011 were no exception. Alexandra Délano and Benjamin Nienass look at how, in the wake of 9/11, the undocumented immigrants that were involved in the tragedy and their families were practically ‘invisible’ to state and non-state institutions who would have otherwise provided assistance and recognition. They argue that this failure of public life for undocumented immigrants is down to their own fears about coming forward due to their legal status, procedural requirements which called for documents that they did not possess, and the post 9/11 associations between immigration, security and terrorism.

Item Type: Online resource (Blog Entry)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2014 The Authors; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
J Political Science > JK Political institutions (United States)
J Political Science > JV Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2014 13:18
Last Modified: 18 Sep 2019 23:17
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/59855

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