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The growth of conspiracy theorising is influenced by dominant media narratives and news framing practices

Marmura, Stephen E.M. (2014) The growth of conspiracy theorising is influenced by dominant media narratives and news framing practices. LSE American Politics and Policy (23 Sep 2014). Website.

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Abstract

How might social scientists best account for the widespread acceptance of such unlikely sounding claims such as those put forward by the 9/11 Truth Movement, or those concerning the alleged foreign birth of President Obama? While comparably “ignorant” or “bizarre” beliefs might seem unremarkable in societies characterised by authoritarian rule, state controlled media and low levels of literacy, Stephen E.M. Marmura asks how does one hope to explain the persistence and apparent growth of conspiracy theories in developed countries such as the United States or Britain, which boast high levels of education, freedom of expression, political openness, and competitive, privatised, mass media institutions?

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2014 The Author; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
J Political Science > JK Political institutions (United States)
P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN1990 Broadcasting
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2014 13:06
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2020 23:15
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/59854

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