Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Management practices and the quality of care in cardiac units

McConnell, K. John, Lindrooth, Richard C., Wholey, Douglas R., Maddox, Thomas M. and Bloom, Nicholas (2013) Management practices and the quality of care in cardiac units. Journal of American Medical Association: Internal Medicine, 173 (8). pp. 684-692. ISSN 2168-6106

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Download (495kB) | Preview
Identification Number: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.3577

Abstract

Importance:- To improve the quality of health care, many researchers have suggested that health care institutions adopt management approaches that have been successful in the manufacturing and technology sectors. However, relatively little information exists about how these practices are disseminated in hospitals and whether they are associated with better performance. Objectives:- To describe the variation in management practices among a large sample of hospital cardiac care units; assess association of these practices with processes of care, readmissions, and mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI); and suggest specific directions for the testing and dissemination of health care management approaches. Design:- We adapted an approach used to measure management and organizational practices in manufacturing to collect management data on cardiac units. We scored performance in 18 practices using the following 4 dimensions: standardizing care, tracking of key performance indicators, setting targets, and incentivizing employees. We used multivariate analyses to assess the relationship of management practices with process-of-care measures, 30-day risk-adjusted mortality, and 30-day readmissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Setting:- Cardiac units in US hospitals. Participants_ Five hundred ninety-seven cardiac units, representing 51.5% of hospitals with interventional cardiac catheterization laboratories and at least 25 annual AMI discharges. Main Outcome Measures:- Process-of-care measures, 30-day risk-adjusted mortality, and 30-day readmissions for AMI. Results:- We found a wide distribution in management practices, with fewer than 20% of hospitals scoring a 4 or a 5 (best practice) on more than 9 measures. In multivariate analyses, management practices were significantly correlated with mortality (P = .01) and 6 of 6 process measures (P < .05). No statistically significant association was found between management and 30-day readmissions. Conclusions and Relevance:- The use of management practices adopted from manufacturing sectors is associated with higher process-of-care measures and lower 30-day AMI mortality. Given the wide differences in management practices across hospitals, dissemination of these practices may be beneficial in achieving high-quality outcomes. Interest in quality improvement in health care during the past 10 years has been associated with a handful of important successes.1- 3 However, improvements in the quality of care have been slower than many would have hoped for,4- 8 and quality is still highly variable across organizations.9 Although significant effort has been focused on the use of evidence-based medicine—clinical practices that lead to better care—an interest in organizational strategies and management practices that enable and incentivize high-quality health care is emerging.10- 15 One of the most active areas of interest is in the use of management practices with origins in manufacturing, including, for example, “Lean” methodologies developed at Toyota16 or the use of balanced scorecard approaches that originated in the technology sector.17 These management approaches can be characterized as a set of formalized tools, the use of which is intended to improve quality through multiple pathways, such as eliminating inefficient and variable practices; engaging providers in a collaborative, team-based approach; and structuring mechanisms for setting targets and tracking progress. However, the evidence on the potential effectiveness of these approaches in health care is relatively weak13,18 and consists primarily of single-site studies.19- 21 To address this gap in knowledge, we present a new framework and instrument for defining key management dimensions and for measuring them on a large scale in health care organizations. We describe the variation in management practices among a large sample of hospitals; assess its association with processes of care, readmissions, and mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI); and suggest specific directions for the testing and dissemination of health care management approaches.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/journal.aspx
Additional Information: © 2013 American Medical Association
Divisions: Centre for Economic Performance
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Sets: Research centres and groups > Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)
Date Deposited: 02 Sep 2014 11:15
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2020 05:13
Funders: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (grant 1R01HS018466)
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/59336

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics