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Varieties of capitalism and job quality: the attainment of civic principles at work in the United States and Germany

Frege, Carola M. and Godard, John (2014) Varieties of capitalism and job quality: the attainment of civic principles at work in the United States and Germany. American Sociological Review, 79 (5). pp. 942-965. ISSN 0003-1224

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Identification Number: 10.1177/0003122414548194

Abstract

This article explores how institutional differences matter to the quality of a nation’s jobs; job quality is conceived as a dimension of a national economy’s social performance and thus defined in accordance with civic principles. Focus is on the two archetypical varieties of capitalism, the United States and Germany. Using data from a 2009 telephone survey of U.S. and German workers, we find that the overall attainment of civic principles, as perceived by workers, is no different in Germany than in the United States, even though the German institutional environment should be more conducive to them. This is due to higher worker expectations in Germany and a tendency for employer practices to compensate for the weaker (liberal) institutional environment in the United States. Once these are controlled, German workers report substantially more positive outcomes. We find that institutional differences also matter in how various employer practices are adopted and hence have indirect as well as direct implications.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://asr.sagepub.com/
Additional Information: © 2014 American Sociological Association
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Sets: Departments > Management
Research centres and groups > Employment Relations and Human Resource Management Group
Collections > United States Collection
Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2014 15:25
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 11:03
Funders: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/57608

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