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Use IT or lose IT?: the impact of computers on earnings

Dolton, Peter, Makepeace, Gerry and Robinson, Helen (2007) Use IT or lose IT?: the impact of computers on earnings. CEEDP, 82. Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK. ISBN 9780853281993

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Abstract

The extent to which the impact of computer skills depends on how computers are used is investigated using British data from an establishment survey, cohort studies and the European E-Living survey. We examine the importance of activity and frequency of use in these various data sources. We find that the impact on earnings depends on which cohort of workers is examined and that there are differences over time. The regression results show that the use of computers for internet access and for email is positively significant across all of our datasets, although there are differences in the size of the effects between men and women.

Item Type: Monograph (Discussion Paper)
Official URL: http://cee.lse.ac.uk
Additional Information: © 2007 the authors
Library of Congress subject classification: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
Journal of Economic Literature Classification System: J - Labor and Demographic Economics > J3 - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs > J31 - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials by Skill, Training, Occupation, etc.
Sets: Research centres and groups > Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE)
Collections > Economists Online
Research centres and groups > Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)
Rights: http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/usingTheLibrary/academicSupport/OA/depositYourResearch.aspx
Identification Number: 82
Date Deposited: 14 Jul 2008 15:08
URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/19387/

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