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How can health technology assessment be improved to optimise access to medicines? Results from a Delphi study in Europe

Fontrier, Anna-Maria, Kamphuis, Bregtje W. and Kanavos, Panos ORCID: 0000-0001-9518-3089 (2023) How can health technology assessment be improved to optimise access to medicines? Results from a Delphi study in Europe. European Journal of Health Economics. ISSN 1618-7598 (In Press)

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Identification Number: 10.1007/s10198-023-01637-z

Abstract

Introduction: Access to medicines is a shared goal across healthcare stakeholders. Since health technology assessment (HTA) informs funding decisions, it shapes access to medicines. Despite its wide implementation, significant access variations due to HTA are observed across Europe. This paper elicited the opinions of European stakeholders on how HTA can be improved to facilitate access. Methods: A scoping review identified HTA features that influence access to medicines within markets and areas for improvement, while three access dimensions were identified (availability, affordability, timeliness). Using the Delphi method, we elicited the opinions of European stakeholders to validate the literature findings. Results: Nineteen participants from 14 countries participated in the Delphi panel. Thirteen HTA features that could be improved to optimise access to medicines in Europe were identified. Of these, 11 recorded a positive impact on at least one of the three access dimensions. HTA features had mostly a positive impact on timeliness and a less clear impact on affordability. ‘Early scientific advice’ and ‘clarity in evidentiary requirements’ showed a positive impact on all access dimensions. 'Established ways to deal with uncertainty during HTA’ could improve medicines’ availability and timeliness, while more ‘reliance on real-world evidence’ could expedite time to market access. Conclusions: Our results reiterate that increased transparency during HTA and the decision-making processes is essential; the use of and reliance on new evidence generation such as real-world evidence can optimise the availability of medicines; and better collaborations between regulatory institutions within and between countries are paramount for better access to medicines.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.springer.com/journal/10198
Additional Information: © 2023 The Author(s)
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
T Technology
JEL classification: I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I0 - General > I00 - General
I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I10 - General
I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I11 - Analysis of Health Care Markets
I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I18 - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
Date Deposited: 25 Oct 2023 16:06
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2024 20:45
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/120537

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