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Updating impressions: the differential effects of new performance information on evaluations of women and men

Heilman, Madeline E., Manzi, Francesca ORCID: 0000-0002-6074-4680 and Caleo, Suzette (2019) Updating impressions: the differential effects of new performance information on evaluations of women and men. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 152. 105 - 121. ISSN 0749-5978

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Identification Number: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2019.03.010

Abstract

In three experimental studies we investigated whether changes in performance would have different consequences on the competence perceptions and performance evaluations of women and men whose earlier performance had been unmistakably successful or unsuccessful. We reasoned that the ambiguity created by new performance information that was inconsistent with previous performance information would facilitate stereotype-based gender bias. The results provided support for this idea. Whereas no differences emerged between reactions to men and women when performance remained the same, differences emerged when performance changed. Moreover, regardless of the nature of the change in performance, in male gender-typed domains women were evaluated more negatively than men: an improvement in performance had a less beneficial effect for women than for men (Study 1) and a decline in performance had a more detrimental effect for women than for men (Study 2). These effects were shown to be moderated by the gender-type of the field. Women were evaluated more negatively than men whether performance improved or declined only when the field was male gender-typed; when the field was female gender-typed, men were evaluated more negatively than women (Study 3). These findings are consistent with the idea that gender stereotypes and the performance expectations they produce can influence responses to new information about men’s and women’s performance.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/organization...
Additional Information: © 2019 Elsevier Inc
Divisions: Management
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2022 11:45
Last Modified: 16 May 2024 03:55
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/116974

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