Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Who you gonna call? Theorising everyday security practices in urban spaces with multiple security actors – the case of Beirut's Southern Suburbs

Gunning, Jeroen and Smaira, Dima (2022) Who you gonna call? Theorising everyday security practices in urban spaces with multiple security actors – the case of Beirut's Southern Suburbs. Political Geography, 98. ISSN 0962-6298

[img] Text (Who you gonna call?* Theorising everyday security practices in urban spaces with multiple security actors – The case of Beirut’s Southern Suburbs) - Accepted Version
Repository staff only until 9 August 2024.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy

Identification Number: 10.1016/j.polgeo.2021.102485

Abstract

Who do urban residents turn to in everyday security incidents? Why do some go to the police in certain locations, others to armed nonstate actors or kinship networks? We explore the ways in which residents and security actors – state and nonstate – negotiate everyday (in)security in contested urban spaces with multiple security actors. We consider how hybrid security assemblages are shaped by physical and social space and how everyday security practices shape space. We use Beirut's Southern Suburbs (Dahiyeh) as a site of theorisation, bringing local vernacular experiences into dialogue with Bourdieu's concepts of capital, habitus, doxa and field to develop a spatially dynamic analytical framework. Using this framework, we map security actors' different types and sizes of capital and how this capital is affected by residents' habitus and doxa within the everyday security field. We introduce the notion of ‘translocal habitus’ to capture the impact of families' origins outside Dahiyeh on everyday security dynamics. The framework we develop contributes to the spatialisation, vernacularisation and pluralisation of everyday security studies, furthers the spatialisation of Bourdieu and adds to the literature on hybrid forms of governance. Our analysis is based on extensive fieldwork, including over 150 interviews and ‘street chats’ with residents and security actors in and around Dahiyeh.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/political-ge...
Additional Information: © 2022 Elsevier Ltd.
Divisions: Middle East Centre
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
Date Deposited: 22 Sep 2022 23:32
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2024 18:57
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/116669

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics