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People versus machines: the impact of being in an automatable job on Australian worker's mental health and life satisfaction

Lordan, Grace and Stringer, Eliza-Jane (2022) People versus machines: the impact of being in an automatable job on Australian worker's mental health and life satisfaction. IZA discussion paper (15182). Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), Bonn, Germany.

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Abstract

This study explores the effect on mental health and life satisfaction of working in an automatable job. We utilise an Australian panel dataset (HILDA), and estimate models that include individual fixed effects, to estimate the association between automatable work and proxies of wellbeing. Overall, we find evidence that automatable work has a small, detrimental impact on the mental health and life satisfaction of workers within some industries, particularly those with higher levels of job automation risk, such as manufacturing. Furthermore, we find no strong trends to suggest that any particular demographic group is disproportionately impacted across industries. These findings are robust to a variety of specifications. We also find evidence of adaptation to these effects after one-year tenure on the job, indicating a limited role for firm policy.

Item Type: Monograph (Discussion Paper)
Official URL: https://www.iza.org/publications/dp
Additional Information: © 2022 Deutsche Post STIFTUNG
Divisions: Psychological and Behavioural Science
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
JEL classification: I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I10 - General
J - Labor and Demographic Economics > J2 - Time Allocation, Work Behavior, and Employment Determination and Creation; Human Capital; Retirement > J20 - General
Date Deposited: 12 Apr 2022 14:24
Last Modified: 12 Apr 2022 14:24
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/114874

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