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Families’ perceptions of corporate influence in career and technical education through data extraction

Hillman, Velislava and Bryant, Jeff (2022) Families’ perceptions of corporate influence in career and technical education through data extraction. Learning, Media and Technology. pp. 1-14. ISSN 1743-9884

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Identification Number: 10.1080/17439884.2022.2059765

Abstract

This paper addresses families’ perceptions of corporate influence in career and technical education (CTE) through market-driven policies that enable data extraction for student profiling and seek to align K-12 education with business-driven needs. Aligning education with business needs can offer early employment, however, accelerating technological developments risk subjecting hyper-specialised individuals to highly unpredictable labour markets and ultimately job insecurity. Using grounded theory, we conducted in-depth interviews with families across the United States, to obtain their views on the hyper-specialisation in CTE. The emerging discourse is that powerful corporations offer makeshift hyper-specialisation curricula that fit their business needs and do not necessarily reflect, or indeed, consider children’s best interests. This research contributes to scholarship by elucidating the views of families affected by the corporate influence in CTE. The collected stakeholder accounts suggest the need for more in-depth research on individuals who rely on CTE for future employment.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/journals/cjem20
Additional Information: © 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
Divisions: Media and Communications
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2022 14:03
Last Modified: 25 Jun 2022 23:17
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/114581

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