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Similarities and differences in Health Technology Assessment systems and implications for coverage decisions: evidence from 32 countries

Fontrier, Anna-Maria, Visintin, Erica and Kanavos, Panos ORCID: 0000-0001-9518-3089 (2022) Similarities and differences in Health Technology Assessment systems and implications for coverage decisions: evidence from 32 countries. PHARMACOECONOMICS-OPEN, 6 (3). 315 - 328. ISSN 2509-4262

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Identification Number: 10.1007/s41669-021-00311-5

Abstract

Health technology assessment (HTA) systems across countries vary in the way they are set up, according to their role and based on how funding decisions are reached. Our objective was to study the characteristics of these systems and their likely impact on the funding of technologies undergoing HTA. Based on a literature review, we created a conceptual framework that captures key operating features of HTA systems. We used this framework to map current HTA activities across 32 countries in the European Union, the UK, Canada and Australia. Evidence was collected through a systematic search of competent authority websites and grey literature sources. Primary data collection through expert consultation validated our findings and further complemented the analysis. Sixty-three HTA bodies were identified. Most have a national scope (76%), are independent (73%), have an advisory role (52%), evaluate pharmaceuticals predominantly or exclusively (76%), assess health technologies based on their clinical and cost-effectiveness (73%) and involve various stakeholders as members of the HTA committee (94%) and/or through external consultation (76%). The majority of HTA outcomes are not legally binding (81%). Although all study countries implement HTA, the way it fits into decision-making, negotiation processes, and coverage and funding decisions differs significantly across countries. HTA is a dynamic and transformative process and there is a need for transparency to investigate whether evidence-based information influences coverage decisions.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.springer.com/journal/41669
Additional Information: © 2021 The Authors
Divisions: LSE Health
Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
JEL classification: I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I10 - General
I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I11 - Analysis of Health Care Markets
I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I18 - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2021 11:48
Last Modified: 10 May 2022 08:48
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/112969

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