Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Covid-19 school shutdowns: what will they do to our children's education?

Eyles, Andrew, Gibbons, Stephen and Montebruno, Piero (2020) Covid-19 school shutdowns: what will they do to our children's education? CEP Covid-19 Analysis (001). London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

[img] Text (Eyles_covid-19-school-shutdowns--published) - Published Version
Download (978kB)

Abstract

Evidence from unexpected temporary school closures and reduced instruction time suggests school closures will reduce educational achievement, both in the short and long term. Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are likely to be affected more than others by school closures, with fewer family resources and less access to online learning resources to offset lost instruction time. In England, the total cost of the resources lost in each week of state school closure is more than £1 billion. Educational deficits from time lost to school shutdowns can be made up with additional hours of teaching when schools reopen, though schools might need to put back more hours than were lost and it may not be feasible to do this within the traditional school year. Compensating lost instruction time through additional resources, without additional hours, is likely to be even more expensive.

Item Type: Monograph (Working Paper)
Official URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/analyses.as...
Additional Information: © 2020 The Authors
Divisions: Centre for Economic Performance
Geography & Environment
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2020 11:57
Last Modified: 30 Jul 2020 23:10
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/104675

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics