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Lobbying expenditures and campaign contributions by the pharmaceutical and health-product industry in the United States, 1999- 2018

Wouters, Olivier J. (2020) Lobbying expenditures and campaign contributions by the pharmaceutical and health-product industry in the United States, 1999- 2018. Journal of American Medical Association: Internal Medicine, 180 (5). pp. 688-697. ISSN 2168-6106

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Identification Number: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0146

Abstract

Importance: Government efforts to lower drug costs and other legislative and regulatory initiatives may be counteracted by campaign donors and lobbyists in the pharmaceutical and health product industry. Objective: To review how much money the pharmaceutical and health product industry spent on campaign contributions and lobbying in the US from 1999 to 2018 at the federal and state levels. Design and Setting: Analysis of federal-level and state-level data obtained from the Center for Responsive Politics and the National Institute on Money in Politics, respectively. These nonprofit, nonpartisan organizations track federal and state campaign contributions and lobbying expenditures by individuals and groups. Exposures: Lobbying expenditures and contributions to political campaigns. Main Outcomes and Measures: Total spending, inflation adjusted to 2018 dollars using the US Consumer Price Index, on lobbying and campaign contributions by year, source, and state. Results: From 1999 to 2018, the pharmaceutical and health product industry recorded $4.7 billion- A n average of $233 million per year-in lobbying expenditures at the federal level, more than any other industry. Of the spending, the trade group Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America accounted for $422 million (9.0%), and the other 19 top companies and organizations in this industry accounted for $2.2 billion (46.8%). The industry spent $414 million on contributions to candidates in presidential and congressional elections, national party committees, and outside spending groups. Of this amount, $22 million went to presidential candidates and $214 million went to congressional candidates. Of the 20 senators and 20 representatives who received the most contributions, 39 belonged to committees with jurisdiction over health-related legislative matters, 24 of them in senior positions. The industry contributed $877 million to state candidates and committees, of which $399 million (45.5%) went to recipients in California and $287 million (32.7%) went to recipients in 9 other states. In years in which key state referenda on reforms in drug pricing and regulation were being voted on, there were large spikes in contributions to groups that opposed or supported the reforms. Conclusions and Relevance: From 1999 to 2018, the pharmaceutical and health product industry spent large sums of money on lobbying and campaign contributions to influence legislative and election outcomes. These findings can inform discussions about how to temper the influence of industry on US health policy.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedic...
Additional Information: © 2020 Wouters OJ. JAMA Internal Medicine.
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
J Political Science > JK Political institutions (United States)
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2020 11:27
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2020 09:27
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/103689

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