Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Childhood radicalisation and parental extremism: how should family law respond? Insights from a Local Authority v X, Y and Z

Ahdash, Fatima (2020) Childhood radicalisation and parental extremism: how should family law respond? Insights from a Local Authority v X, Y and Z. In: Rehman, Javaid, Shahid, Ayesha and Foster, Steve, (eds.) The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law,4 (4). Brill Academic Publishers, Leiden, Netherlands. ISBN 9789004431751 (In Press)

[img] Text (Fatima Ahdash-Childhood-Radicalisation-and-Parental-Extremism- Author_2019_) - Accepted Version
Repository staff only until 24 September 2022.

Download (549kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

A Local Authority v X, Y and Z (Permission to Withdraw) is a recent case in a series of cases appearing before the family courts, referred to as the radicalisation cases, which deal with concerns related to extremism, radicalisation and terrorism and their impact on children and families. The radicalisation cases represent a significant legal development and a unique legal moment, facilitating an unprecedented interaction between counter-terrorism and family law. The cases pose a number of important and serious legal questions: how should the law, and in particular family law, respond to fears that a child is at risk of childhood radicalisation? How should it deal with the terrorist and/or extremists as a parent? A Local Authority v X, Y and Z is an important radicalisation case which addresses these questions. In this article, I examine how the case deals with two issues: a) childhood radicalisation and its treatment by family law as a separate, free-standing harm which can justify compulsory state intervention and b) the question of parental extremism and/or involvement in terrorist related activity. I claim that although the case includes an important and welcome reaffirmation of the principles of family law in the face of worrying recent developments in the counter-terrorist landscape, this reaffirmation remains fragile, arguing that the case represents a missed opportunity for the family courts to critically reflect on and appraise the nature and purpose of family law’s interaction with counter-terrorism.

Item Type: Book Section
Official URL: https://brill.com/view/title/57580
Additional Information: © 2020 Brill
Divisions: Law
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
K Law > KD England and Wales
Date Deposited: 01 May 2019 15:00
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2020 23:21
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/100718

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics