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Cost-effectiveness of antidepressants versus active monitoring for mild-to-moderate major depressive disorder: a multisite non-randomized-controlled trial in primary care (INFAP study)

Rubio-Valera, Maria, Peñarrubia-María, María Teresa, Iglesias-González, Maria, Knapp, Martin ORCID: 0000-0003-1427-0215, McCrone, Paul, Roig, Marta, Sabes-Figuera, Ramón, Luciano, Juan V., Mendive, Juan M., Murrugara-Centurión, Ana Gabriela, Alonso, Jordi and Serrano-Blanco, Antoni (2019) Cost-effectiveness of antidepressants versus active monitoring for mild-to-moderate major depressive disorder: a multisite non-randomized-controlled trial in primary care (INFAP study). European Journal of Health Economics, 20 (5). pp. 703-713. ISSN 1618-7598

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Identification Number: 10.1007/s10198-019-01034-5

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of antidepressants vs active monitoring (AM) for patients with mild–moderate major depressive disorder. Methods: This was a 12-month observational prospective controlled trial. Adult patients with a new episode of major depression were invited to participate and assigned to AM or antidepressants according to General Practitioners’ clinical judgment and experience. Patients were evaluated at baseline, and 6 and 12-month follow-up. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained were estimated and used to calculate incremental cost–utility ratios (ICUR) from the healthcare and government perspective. To minimize the bias resulting from non-randomization, a propensity score-based method was used. Results: At 6 and 12-month follow-up, ICUR was 2549 €/QALY and 6,142 €/QALY, respectively, in favor of antidepressants. At 6 months, for a willingness to pay (WTP) of 25,000 €/QALY, antidepressants had a probability of 0.89 (healthcare perspective) and 0.81 (government perspective) of being more cost-effective than AM. At 12 months, this probability was 0.86 (healthcare perspective) and 0.73 (government perspective). Conclusions: Incremental cost–utility ratios favor pharmacological treatment as a first-line approach for patients with mild–moderate major depressive disorder. While our results should be interpreted with caution and further real world research is needed, clinical practice guidelines should consider antidepressant therapy for mild–moderate major depressive patients as an alternative to active monitoring in PC.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2019 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Divisions: Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Date Deposited: 28 Mar 2019 00:13
Last Modified: 16 Jan 2020 00:48
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/100362

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