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There is a large disparity between what people see in social media about health research and the underlying strength of evidence

Haber, Noah, Breskin, Alexander, Moscoe, Ellen and Smith, Emily R. (2018) There is a large disparity between what people see in social media about health research and the underlying strength of evidence. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (02 Jul 2018). Blog Entry.

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Abstract

Our social media feeds are full of articles shared by friends and family that make claims about how something can prevent a particular health condition. But how robust is the scientific evidence base underpinning these claims? Noah Haber, Alexander Breskin, Ellen Moscoe and Emily R. Smith, on behalf of the CLAIMS team, report on a systematic review of the state of causal inference in media articles and academic studies at the point of consumption on social media. There is a large disparity between what people see in social media about health research compared with the underlying strength of evidence, both in the studies themselves and in the media articles describing their findings. The studies tend to imply stronger causal inference than their methods merit, while media articles reporting on them were found to be further overstated and inaccurate.

Item Type: Online resource (Blog Entry)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2018...
Additional Information: © 2018 The Authors; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HE Transportation and Communications
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Sets: Collections > Impact of Social Sciences Blog at LSE
Date Deposited: 10 Dec 2018 12:22
Last Modified: 20 Feb 2019 12:52
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/91157

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