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Independent evaluation of Bump Buddies, Shoreditch Trust

Sampson, Alice (2017) Independent evaluation of Bump Buddies, Shoreditch Trust. . Mannheim Centre for Criminology, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

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Abstract

Bump Buddies (BB) offers a service to women who are experiencing a range of challenging issues during their pregnancy and early parenthood. These women may be homeless, asylum seekers, living in poverty, survivors of domestic violence, have poor mental health or previous traumatic experiences giving birth. The service is provided by one full-time and two part-time staff and by volunteer mentors who are local mothers. The BB programme is situated within Shoreditch Trust, a voluntary organisation in the London Borough of Hackney, and contributes to their strategic aim to reduce economic and social disadvantage in the borough. This independent evaluation study was started by the researcher at the Centre for Social Justice and Change, University of East London in May 2016 and completed whilst visiting the Mannheim Centre for Crime and Criminology, London School of Economics, in July 2017. Our research approach is problems-based and realistic and data collected and collated included academic studies, BB reports, project monitoring data, case files (14), selfcompletion questionnaires (7 by mentors and 25 by mentees) interviews with women (6), mentors (6) and partners (4) and three in-depth discussions with staff. BB is an intervention at a critical juncture in the lives of women as they transition from pregnancy to giving birth and early motherhood and offers emotional and practical support at these times of heightened vulnerability, which are also opportunities for change. Previous studies have found peer mentoring offers positive experiences but no discernible additional maternal or child outcomes even though there is strong evidence for the need to intervene to improve life chances of these families.

Item Type: Monograph (Report)
Additional Information: © 2018 The Author
Divisions: Social Policy
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Date Deposited: 10 Oct 2018 09:55
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2020 23:22
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/90396

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