Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

The effect of subgroup homogeneity of efficacy on contribution in public good dilemmas

Yam, Paton Pak Chun and Ng, Gary Ting Tat and Au, Wing Tung and Tao, Lin and Lu, Su and Leung, Hildie and Fung, Jane M. Y. (2018) The effect of subgroup homogeneity of efficacy on contribution in public good dilemmas. PLOS One, 13 (7). e0201473. ISSN 1932-6203

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (2MB) | Preview
Identification Number: 10.1371/journal.pone.0201473

Abstract

This paper examines how to maximize contribution in public good dilemmas by arranging people into homogeneous or heterogeneous subgroups. Past studies on the effect of homogeneity of efficacy have exclusively manipulated group composition in their experimental designs, which might have imposed a limit on ecological validity because group membership may not be easily changed in reality. In this study, we maintained the same group composition but varied the subgroup composition. We developed a public good dilemmas paradigm in which participants were assigned to one of the four conditions (high- vs. low-efficacy; homogeneous vs. heterogeneous subgroup) to produce their endowments and then to decide how much to contribute. We found that individuals in homogeneous and heterogeneous subgroups produced a similar amount and proportion of contribution, which was due to the two mediating effects that counteracted each other, namely (a) perceived efficacy relative to subgroup and (b) expectation of contribution of other subgroup members. This paper demonstrates both the pros and cons of arranging people into homogeneous and heterogeneous subgroups of efficacy.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/
Additional Information: © 2018 the Authors
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Sets: Departments > Psychological and Behavioural Science
Date Deposited: 15 Aug 2018 08:56
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2018 09:04
Projects: 14605416
Funders: Hong Kong Research Grants Council General Research Fund 2016
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/89856

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics