Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Patient-reported outcome measurements in clinical routine of trauma, spine and craniomaxillofacial surgeons: between expectations and reality: a survey among 1212 surgeons

Joeris, Alexander, Knoll, Christian, Kalampoki, Vasiliki, Blumenthal, Andrea and Gaskell, George (2018) Patient-reported outcome measurements in clinical routine of trauma, spine and craniomaxillofacial surgeons: between expectations and reality: a survey among 1212 surgeons. BMJ Open, 2018 (8). e020629. ISSN 2044-6055

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (667kB) | Preview

Identification Number: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020629

Abstract

Objective To gain information about the advantages/disadvantages of an implementation of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) into the clinical routine of trauma/orthopaedic surgeons, and to identify the technical constraints confronting a successful implementation of PROMs. Design Online survey. Participants Surgeons who are members of the AO Foundation. Measures Participants answered questions regarding demographics, their familiarity with specific and generic PROMs and the use of PROMs in clinical routine. Furthermore, reasons for/against using PROMs, why not used more often, prerequisites to implement PROMs into clinical routine and whether PROMs would be implemented if adequate tools/technologies were available, were solicited. Χ2 tests and multivariable logistic regressions were conducted to evaluate the effect of the AO Region, surgeon specialisation, current position, clinical experience, and workplace on the familiarity with disease-specific PROMs, the familiarity with generic PROMs and the current use of PROMs. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify issues underlying the extent of PROM usage. Results 1212 surgeons completed the survey (response rate: 6.8%; margin of error: ±2.72%): 54.2% were trauma/orthopaedic surgeons, 16.6% were spine surgeons, 27.9% were craniomaxillofacial surgeons and 16 had no defined specialty. Working in a certain AO Region, surgical specialisation and current workplace were associated with a higher familiarity of disease-specific PROMs and the use of PROMs in daily clinical routine (p≤0.05). Exploratory factor analysis identified four categories important for the use of PROMs and two categories preventing the use of PROMs. In case of the availability of an adequate tool, 66.2% of surgeons would implement PROMs in clinical routine. Conclusions Our survey results provide an understanding of the use of PROMs in clinical routine. There is consensus on the usefulness of PROMs. User-friendly and efficient tools/technologies would be a prerequisite for the daily use of PROMs. Additionally, educational efforts and/or policies might help.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Additional Information: © 2018 the Authors
Divisions: Methodology
Subjects: R Medicine > RD Surgery
Sets: Departments > Methodology
Date Deposited: 13 Aug 2018 11:06
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2019 00:13
Funders: AO Foundation
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/89835

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics