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Living well with dementia: a systematic review and correlational meta-analysis of factors associated with quality of life, well-being and life satisfaction in people with dementia

Martyr, Anthony, Nelis, Sharon M., Quinn, Catherine, Wu, Yu-Tzu, Lamont, Ruth A., Henderson, Catherine, Clarke, Rachel, Hindle, John V., Thom, Jeanette M., Jones, Ian Rees, Morris, Robin G., Rusted, Jennifer M., Victor, Christina R. and Clare, Linda (2018) Living well with dementia: a systematic review and correlational meta-analysis of factors associated with quality of life, well-being and life satisfaction in people with dementia. Psychological Medicine, 48 (13). pp. 2130-2139. ISSN 0033-2917

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Identification Number: 10.1017/S0033291718000405

Abstract

Current policy emphasises the importance of ‘living well’ with dementia, but there has been no comprehensive synthesis of the factors related to quality of life (QoL), subjective well-being or life satisfaction in people with dementia. We examined the available evidence in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched electronic databases until 7 January 2016 for observational studies investigating factors associated with QoL, well-being and life satisfaction in people with dementia. Articles had to provide quantitative data and include ⩾75% people with dementia of any type or severity. We included 198 QoL studies taken from 272 articles in the meta-analysis. The analysis focused on 43 factors with sufficient data, relating to 37639 people with dementia. Generally, these factors were significantly associated with QoL, but effect sizes were often small (0.1–0.29) or negligible (<0.09). Factors reflecting relationships, social engagement and functional ability were associated with better QoL. Factors indicative of poorer physical and mental health (including depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms) and poorer carer well-being were associated with poorer QoL. Longitudinal evidence about predictors of QoL was limited. There was a considerable between-study heterogeneity. The pattern of numerous predominantly small associations with QoL suggests a need to reconsider approaches to understanding and assessing living well with dementia.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/psychologi...
Additional Information: © 2018 Cambridge University Press © CC BY 4.0
Divisions: Social Policy
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2018 13:41
Last Modified: 20 May 2019 00:10
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/88292

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