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Efficacy of a micro-prompting technology in reducing support needed by people with severe acquired brain injury in activities of daily living

OʼNeill, Brian, Best, Catherine, OʼNeill, Lauren, Ramos, Sara D. S. and Gillespie, Alex (2017) Efficacy of a micro-prompting technology in reducing support needed by people with severe acquired brain injury in activities of daily living. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 33 (5). ISSN 0885-9701

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Identification Number: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000358

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an automated interactive prompting technology in supporting the morning routine of persons with acquired brain injury. The morning routine included maintaining personal hygiene and dressing. Setting: An inpatient neurorehabilitation hospital. Participants: Persons with acquired brain injury who required prompting when following their morning routine (n = 24), but were not limited by physical disability or dysphasia, took part in the study. Participants (67% with traumatic brain injury) had impairment on indices of memory and executive function. Design: A randomized control trial evaluated the effect of an automated interactive micro-prompting device on the number of prompts by trained staff required for successful completion of the morning routine. Main Measures: Study-specific checklists assessed sequence performance, errors, and verbal prompts required over baseline, rehabilitation as usual, intervention, and return to baseline conditions. Results: The intervention significantly reduced the support required to complete the task compared with usual rehabilitation. Conclusions: Micro-prompting technology is an effective assistive technology for cognition, which reduces support needs in people with significant cognitive impairments.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://journals.lww.com/headtraumarehab/pages/def...
Additional Information: © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.
Divisions: Psychological and Behavioural Science
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
R Medicine > RD Surgery
Sets: Departments > Psychological and Behavioural Science
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2018 14:31
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2019 02:58
Projects: CZH/4/598
Funders: Scottish Government
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/87035

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