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The value of treatment of restless legs syndrome: socio-economic impact of RLS and of inadequate diagnosis and treatment across different healthcare systems

Jaarsma, J., Tinelli, Michela, Ferri, R., Dauvilliers, Y., Rijsman, L., Sakkas, G., Trenkwalder, C. and Oertel, W. (2017) The value of treatment of restless legs syndrome: socio-economic impact of RLS and of inadequate diagnosis and treatment across different healthcare systems. Sleep Medicine, 40 (Supplement 1). ISSN 1389-9457

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Identification Number: 10.1016/j.sleep.2017.11.423

Abstract

Introduction: Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is one of the most common neurological disorders. Adult prevalence of moderate to severe RLS in the European population is about 2.7%. The key characteristics, including severe sleep disturbance and restlessness in the evening and night, have substantial impact on normal daily activities. Given the high prevalence in the general population, the low awareness of the disease, and how RLS affects people´s lives, this study set out to evaluate the socio-economic impact of RLS across different EU healthcare systems. Materials and methods: The RLS care pathway was mapped in order to identify the unmet needs of patients as well as the underlying causal factors. The authors describe the patient ´s journey through the healthcare systems in three countries (DE, FR, IT) as well as the barriers to optimal treatment. Based on these data the cost of differences between adequate and inadequate treatment were calculated and the burden of the lack of awareness of RLS, inadequate diagnosis and treatment, as well as the resulting societal cost was unveiled. Results: This analysis finds RLS to be a significant personal and social burden, the second most costly neurological disease in the healthcare systems analysed. The authors foresee substantial economic impacts well beyond what may be anticipated from current epidemiological figures in the literature when adequate diagnosis and treatment of RLS will be in place. Conclusions: Education about RLS is urgently needed to increase expertise of healthcare professionals on how to diagnose and manage RLS. Equally important the search into the cause(s) of RLS and for new treatment strategies have to be intensified in order to reduce suffering and substantial societal cost.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/sleep-medici...
Additional Information: © 2017 Elsevier B.V.
Divisions: Personal Social Services Research Unit
LSE Health
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Sets: Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Research centres and groups > LSE Health
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2018 12:33
Last Modified: 22 Aug 2019 23:07
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/86940

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