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Strengthening mental health care systems for Syrian refugees in Europe and the Middle East: integrating scalable psychological interventions in 8 countries

Sijbrandij, Marit, Acarturk, Ceren, Bird, Martha, Bryant, Richard A., Burchert, Sebastian, Carswell, Kenneth, Dinesen, Cecilie, Dawson, Katie, El Chammay, Rabih, van Ittersum, Linde, de Jong, Joop, Jordans, Mark, Knaevelsrud, Christine, McDaid, David, Morina, Naser, Miller, Kenneth, Park, A-La, Roberts, Bayard, van Son, Yvette, Sondorp, Egbert, Pfaltz, Monique C., Ruttenberg, Leontien, Schick, Matthis, Schnyder, Ulrich, van Ommeren, Mark, Ventevogel, Peter, Weissbecker, Inka, Weitz, Erica, Wiedemann, Nana, Whitney, Claire and Cuijpers, Pim (2017) Strengthening mental health care systems for Syrian refugees in Europe and the Middle East: integrating scalable psychological interventions in 8 countries. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 8 (2). p. 1388102. ISSN 2000-8198

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Identification Number: 10.1080/20008198.2017.1388102

Abstract

The crisis in Syria has resulted in vast numbers of refugees seeking asylum in Syria’s neighbouring countries as well as in Europe. Refugees are at considerable risk of developing common mental disorders, including depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Most refugees do not have access to mental health services for these problems because of multiple barriers in national and refugee specific health systems, including limited availability of mental health professionals. To counter some of challenges arising from limited mental health system capacity the World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a range of scalable psychological interventions aimed at reducing psychological distress and improving functioning in people living in communities affected by adversity. These interventions, including Problem Management Plus (PM+) and its variants, are intended to be delivered through individual or group face to face or smartphone formats by lay, non-professional people who have not received specialized mental health training, We provide an evidence-based rationale for the use of the scalable PM+ oriented programmes being adapted for Syrian refugees and provide information on the newly launched STRENGTHS programme for adapting, testing and scaling up of PM+ in various modalities in both neighbouring and European countries hosting Syrian refugees.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/zept20/current
Additional Information: © 2017 The Authors © CC BY 4.0
Divisions: Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Sets: Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2017 16:39
Last Modified: 20 Feb 2019 12:20
Projects: 733337, REF-1131-52107
Funders: Horizon 2020, Swiss State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/85138

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