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Cultural norms, economic incentives and women's labour market behaviour: Empirical insights from Bangladesh

Heinz, James, Kabeer, Naila ORCID: 0000-0001-7769-9540 and Mahmud, Simeen (2017) Cultural norms, economic incentives and women's labour market behaviour: Empirical insights from Bangladesh. Oxford Development Studies. ISSN 1360-0818

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Identification Number: 10.1080/13600818.2017.1382464

Abstract

This paper sets out to explore a seeming puzzle in the context of Bangladesh. There is a considerable body of evidence from the country pointing to the positive impact of paid work on women’s position within family and community. Yet, according to official statistics, not only has women’s labour force participation risen very slowly over the years, but also a sizeable majority of women in the labour force are in unpaid family labour. We draw on an original survey of over 5000 women from eight different districts in Bangladesh to explore some of the factors that lead to women’s selection into the labour force, and into different categories of labour market activity, with a view to gaining a better understanding of the combination of cultural norms and economic considerations that explain these findings.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cods20
Additional Information: © 2017 The Authors © CC BY 4.0
Divisions: International Development
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Sets: Departments > International Development
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2017 09:42
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2020 02:32
Projects: ES/L005484/1
Funders: Economic and Social Research Council
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/84316

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