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Interventions to provide culturally-appropriate maternity care services: factors affecting implementation

Jones, Eleri, Lattof, Samantha R. and Coast, Ernestina (2017) Interventions to provide culturally-appropriate maternity care services: factors affecting implementation. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 17 (1). p. 267. ISSN 1471-2393

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Identification Number: 10.1186/s12884-017-1449-7

Abstract

Background The World Health Organization recently made a recommendation supporting ‘culturally-appropriate’ maternity care services to improve maternal and newborn health. This recommendation results, in part, from a systematic review we conducted, which showed that interventions to provide culturally-appropriate maternity care have largely improved women’s use of skilled maternity care. Factors relating to the implementation of these interventions can have implications for their success. This paper examines stakeholders’ perspectives and experiences of these interventions, and facilitators and barriers to implementation; and concludes with how they relate to the effects of the interventions on care-seeking outcomes. Methods We based our analysis on 15 papers included in the systematic review. To extract, collate and organise data on the context and conditions from each paper, we adapted the SURE (Supporting the Use of Research Evidence) framework that lists categories of factors that could influence implementation. We considered information from the background and discussion sections of papers included in the systematic review, as well as cost data and qualitative data when included. Results Women’s and other stakeholders’ perspectives on the interventions were generally positive. Four key themes emerged in our analysis of facilitators and barriers to implementation. Firstly, interventions must consider broader economic, geographical and social factors that affect ethnic minority groups’ access to services, alongside providing culturally-appropriate care. Secondly, community participation is important in understanding problems with existing services and potential solutions from the community perspective, and in the development and implementation of interventions. Thirdly, respectful, person-centred care should be at the core of these interventions. Finally, cohesiveness is essential between the culturally-appropriate service and other health care providers encountered by women and their families along the continuum of care through pregnancy until after birth. Conclusion Several important factors should be considered and addressed when implementing interventions to provide culturally-appropriate care. These factors reflect more general goals on the international agenda of improving access to skilled maternity care; providing high-quality, respectful care; and community participation.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/
Additional Information: © 2017 The Authors © CC BY 4.0
Divisions: International Development
Social Policy
LSE Health
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
Sets: Departments > International Development
Departments > Social Policy
Research centres and groups > LSE Health
Date Deposited: 01 Sep 2017 14:39
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2019 02:36
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/84162

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