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Promoting mental well-being among older people: an evidence review of technology-based interventions

Forsman, A. K., Nordmyr, J., Matosevic, T., Wahlbeck, K. and McDaid, D. (2017) Promoting mental well-being among older people: an evidence review of technology-based interventions. Innovation in Aging, 1 (S1). pp. 1185-1186. ISSN 2399-5300

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Identification Number: 10.1093/geroni/igx004.4318

Abstract

Given a changing demographic landscape, the promotion of older adults’ wellbeing and independence is a public health issue. In recent years, the potential of technology-based resources for the promotion of wellbeing in later life has been highlighted. This systematic review analysed the effectiveness of technology-based interventions for the promotion of mental wellbeing among adults aged 65 and over without extensive health or social care needs. The data originates from an evidence review project commissioned by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the UK on the effectiveness of different actions to promote the mental wellbeing of older people. Systematic searches were performed in 8 bibliographic databases. Publications from the period 2003 onwards were considered. From the original review data material, 25 intervention studies were selected for this review, covering technology use for educational purposes, computer/internet exposure or training, telephone/internet communication, or computer gaming. The number of studies employing an RCT design and looking at comparable outcomes was low, resulting in the strength of the evidence being moderate and somewhat inconsistent. When considering the six studies with higher quality ratings, four of them - all focused on computer/internet training - reported significant favorable effects on one or several outcomes among intervention recipients (e.g. increased life satisfaction, experienced social support). While the review results highlight a lack of methodologically rigorous studies evaluating the effects of technology-based interventions for optimal ageing, they also present promising examples of effective interventions that can serve as best practice examples in this emerging field.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/innovateage
Additional Information: © 2017 The Authors
Divisions: Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
T Technology > T Technology (General)
Sets: Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2017 08:42
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2019 12:11
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/84078

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