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Mine is a likable rogue, yours is a degenerate criminal. When it comes to 'dirty campaign tricks' partisans tend to ignore bad news about their own.

Claassen, Ryan L. and Ensley, Michael J. (2017) Mine is a likable rogue, yours is a degenerate criminal. When it comes to 'dirty campaign tricks' partisans tend to ignore bad news about their own. USApp - American Politics and Policy Blog (Jul 2017). Website.

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Abstract

Pundits appear eager to portray the partisan battles waged during the 2016 U.S. presidential election as reaching new lows where dirty politics were concerned. Yet despite massive media interest in dirty politics and academic investigations into many aspects of this soft underbelly of democratic elections, very little is known about the way the public responds to news about dirty politics—whether the misdeed is a stolen yard sign or a more serious allegation of election fraud. Research by Ryan L. Claassen and Michael J. Ensley reveals good reasons for monitoring public reactions to dirty politics. The public are not neutral when news about a political misdeed surfaces—instead the public see the misdeed through partisan lenses. This research raises new and interesting possibilities regarding the implications of Trump’s allegations of election fraud and likely public response to ongoing reports about investigations into alleged collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Item Type: Website (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2017 The Author(s)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 17 Aug 2017 09:36
Last Modified: 17 Aug 2017 09:36
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/84016

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