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Me, myself, and I: self-citation rates are higher in individualist cultures than in collectivist cultures

Deschacht, Nick (2017) Me, myself, and I: self-citation rates are higher in individualist cultures than in collectivist cultures. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (03 Jul 2017). Website.

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Abstract

Citing your own work when publishing a paper may be seen as a way of promoting yourself in academia, as how frequently a paper is cited is often viewed as a measure of its importance. Previous studies have shown that male authors are more likely than their female counterparts to cite themselves, arguably one of the reasons men continue to dominate the academic profession. Reporting on recent research, Nick Deschacht finds that authors from western, individualist cultures are more likely to use many self-citations than authors from more collectivist cultures. Findings demonstrate the need for academic institutions to be aware of the cultural and gendered nature of self- promoting behaviour when making hiring and promotion decisions.

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/
Additional Information: © 2017 The Author(s); Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Sets: Collections > Impact of Social Sciences Blog at LSE
Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2017 10:28
Last Modified: 13 Jun 2020 23:40
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/83927

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