Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

What matters and how it matters: a choice-theoretic representation of moral theories

Dietrich, Franz and List, Christian (2017) What matters and how it matters: a choice-theoretic representation of moral theories. Philosophical Review. ISSN 0031-8108 (In Press)

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Download (930kB) | Preview

Abstract

We present a new “reason-based” approach to the formal representation of moral theories, drawing on recent decision-theoretic work. We show that any moral theory within a very large class can be represented in terms of two parameters: (i) a specification of which properties of the objects of moral choice matter in any given context, and (ii) a specification of how these properties matter. Reasonbased representations provide a very general taxonomy of moral theories, as di↵erences among theories can be attributed to di↵erences in their two key parameters. We can thus formalize several distinctions, such as between consequentialist and non-consequentialist theories, between universalist and relativist theories, between agent-neutral and agent-relative theories, between monistic and pluralistic theories, between atomistic and holistic theories, and between theories with a teleological structure and those without. Reason-based representations also shed light on an important but under-appreciated phenomenon: the “underdetermination of moral theory by deontic content”

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://philreview.dukejournals.org/
Additional Information: © 2017 Cornell University
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BD Speculative Philosophy
Sets: Departments > Government
Departments > Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method
Research centres and groups > Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science (CPNSS)
Date Deposited: 03 May 2017 16:34
Last Modified: 11 May 2017 10:22
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/75232

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics