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Weather shocks and agricultural commercialization in colonial tropical Africa: did cash crops alleviate social distress?

Papaioannou, Kostadis J. and de Haas, Michiel (2017) Weather shocks and agricultural commercialization in colonial tropical Africa: did cash crops alleviate social distress? World Development, 94. pp. 346-365. ISSN 0305-750X

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Identification Number: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2017.01.019

Abstract

A rapidly growing body of research examines the ways in which climatic variability influence economic and societal outcomes. This study investigates how weather shocks triggered social distress in British colonial Africa. Further, it intervenes in a long-standing and unsettled debate concerning the effects of agricultural commercialization on the abilities of rural communities to cope with exogenous shocks. We collect qualitative evidence from annual administrative records to explore the mechanisms linking weather extremes to harvest failures and social distress. We also conduct econometric testing on a novel panel dataset of 143 administrative districts across west, south-central and east Africa in the Interwar Era (1920-1939). Our findings are twofold. First, we find robust evidence that rainfall anomalies (both drought and excessive precipitation) are associated with spikes in imprisonment (our proxy for social distress). We argue that the key causal pathway is the loss of agricultural income, which results in higher imprisonment for theft, unrest, debt and tax default. Second, we find that the impact of weather shocks on distress is partially mitigated by the cultivation of export crops. Our findings suggest that, even in the British colonial context, smallholder export crop cultivation led to higher private incomes as well as greater public investment. Our findings speak to a topic of considerable urgency today as the process of global climate change accelerates, generating more severe and unpredictable climatic extremes. An increased understanding and identification of adaptive and mitigating factors, would assist in targeting policy interventions and designing adaptive institutions to support vulnerable rural societies.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/world-developmen...
Additional Information: © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.
Divisions: International Development
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HB Economic Theory
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
JEL classification: D - Microeconomics > D7 - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making > D74 - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances
F - International Economics > F5 - International Relations and International Political Economy > F54 - Colonialism; Imperialism; Postcolonialism
N - Economic History > N1 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Growth and Fluctuations > N17 - Africa; Oceania
N - Economic History > N5 - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment, and Extractive Industries > N57 - Africa; Oceania
Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics > Q1 - Agriculture > Q17 - Agriculture in International Trade
Sets: Departments > International Development
Date Deposited: 21 Apr 2017 12:08
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2019 03:14
Projects: 313114
Funders: Seventh Framework Programme
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/74029

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