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Managing work-life tensions in the neo-liberal UK

Perrons, Diane (2017) Managing work-life tensions in the neo-liberal UK. In: Brandth, Berit, Halrynjo, Sigtona and Kvande, Elin, (eds.) Work–Family Dynamics: Competing Logics of Regulation, Economy and Morals. Routledge Advances in Sociology. Routledge, Abingdon, UK, pp. 36-51. ISBN 9781138860070

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Abstract

Work-life integration is an increasingly hot topic in the media, social research, governments and in people’s everyday lives. This volume offers a new type of lens for understanding work-family reconciliation by studying how work-family dynamics are shaped, squeezed and developed between consistent or competing logics in different societies in Europe and the US. The three institutions of "state", "family" and "working life", and their under-explored primary logics of "regulation", "morality" and "economic competitiveness" are examined theoretically as well as empirically throughout the chapters, thus contributing to an understanding of the contemporary challenges within the field of work-family research that combines structure and culture. Particular attention is given to the ways in which the institutions are confronted with various moral norms of good parenthood or motherhood and ideals for family life. Likewise, the logic of policy regulation and gendered family moralities are challenged by the economic logic of working life, based on competition in favour of the most productive workers and organizations.

Item Type: Book Section
Official URL: https://www.routledge.com/
Additional Information: © 2017 The Author
Divisions: Gender Studies
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Sets: Departments > Gender Institute
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2017 16:51
Last Modified: 20 Feb 2019 18:24
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/69673

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