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The 1930s and the road to war

Casey, Steven (2016) The 1930s and the road to war. In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of American History. Oxford Research Encyclopedias. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

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Identification Number: 10.1093/acrefore/9780199329175.013.76

Abstract

The United States was extremely reluctant to get drawn into the wars that erupted in Asia in 1937 and Europe in 1939. Deeply disillusioned with the experience of World War I, when the large number of trench warfare casualties had resulted in a peace that many American believed betrayed the aims they had fought for, the United States sought to avoid all forms of entangling alliances. Deeply embittered by the Depression, which was widely blamed on international bankers and businessmen, Congress enacted legislation that sought to prevent these actors from drawing the country into another war. The American aim was neutrality, but the underlying strength of the United States made it too big to be impartial—a problem that Roosevelt had to grapple with as Germany, Italy, and Japan began to challenge international order in the second half of the 1930s.

Item Type: Book Section
Official URL: http://global.oup.com/?cc=gb
Additional Information: © 2016 Oxford University Press
Divisions: International History
Subjects: E History America > E151 United States (General)
J Political Science > JZ International relations
Sets: Departments > International History
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2017 11:25
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2019 02:24
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/68822

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