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Terrorism discourse on French international broadcasting: France 24 and the case of Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris

Polonska-Kimunguyi, Eva and Gillespie, Marie (2016) Terrorism discourse on French international broadcasting: France 24 and the case of Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris. European Journal of Communication, 31 (5). pp. 568-583. ISSN 0267-3231

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Identification Number: 10.1177/0267323116669453

Abstract

This article offers an inquiry into the discursive construction of ‘terrorism’ by France 24, the French international broadcaster, in the aftermath of the attacks on Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in January 2015. The article argues that the broadcaster seems to employ a relatively narrow definition of terrorism linking it to Islam and Muslims. France 24 portrays the attacks as an external phenomenon coming to France from outside. The blame is assigned to non-French factors, mainly to foreign extremist organisations, Islamist ideologues and overseas training. No reasons for violence are sought inside the country. Internal developments, such as discrimination, youth marginalisation, lack of educational and work opportunities, relations between law enforcement and the Muslim community that could potentially contribute to the acts, are not explored by the broadcaster’s investigative journalism. This narrow interpretation of ‘terrorism’ that assigns responsibility to Muslims, Islamic indoctrination and overseas training may further alienate Muslim communities in France’s already divided society. It points to narrow policy responses that focus mainly on stricter monitoring of Muslim minorities, on limiting combat and cross-border movement. This type of discourse excludes long-term policy solutions that address broader socio-politico-economic conditions in which ‘terrorism’ might flourish.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://ejc.sagepub.com/
Additional Information: © 2016 The Authors
Divisions: Media and Communications
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Sets: Departments > Media and Communications
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2016 12:33
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2019 02:20
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/68291

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