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A humanistic approach to caring for street children: The importance of emotionally intimate and supportive relationships for the successful rehabilitation of street children

Schimmel, Noam (2008) A humanistic approach to caring for street children: The importance of emotionally intimate and supportive relationships for the successful rehabilitation of street children. Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies, 3 (3). pp. 214-220. ISSN 1745-0128

Full text not available from this repository.
Identification Number: 10.1080/17450120802032883

Abstract

This article illustrates the psychologically damaging effects that result from living on the street and that negatively impact upon street children's well-being and development. It notes that one of the fundamental deprivations which street children face—often the very deprivation that prompts their decision to move away from home to the street—is that of close, supportive and loving relationships with adult caregivers. It argues that the successful rehabilitation of street children requires an intentional emphasis on building emotionally intimate, supportive relationships between street children and social workers. Drawing upon the humanistic psychology of Carl Rogers, which centers upon the prerequisite of unconditional positive regard for healthy human development, it argues that individuals who have suffered from psychic stress and trauma are in particular need of unconditional positive regard in order to gain self-respect, self-confidence and trust and faith in society and in their capacity to successfully reintegrate themselves into society and become contributing members of society. It argues that the overwhelming emphasis of outreach programs to street children in the developing world is on providing them with their basic needs of food, shelter and clothing, but often disregarding their psychological needs. Such an approach to street children may help them in the short term but impedes the likelihood of their achieving a rehabilitation that is sustainable and that meets the full range of their needs in a holistic manner. This article draws upon experiences of street children and social workers, researchers, nurses and volunteers in Africa, Asia and South America to address these concerns.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/
Additional Information: © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group
Divisions: LSE Health
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Sets: Research centres and groups > LSE Health
Date Deposited: 10 May 2016 13:32
Last Modified: 20 Feb 2019 09:08
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/66452

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