Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Re-thinking risk communication: information needs of patients, health professionals and the public regarding MRSA – the communicative behaviour of a public health network in Germany responding to the demand for information

Dickmann, Petra, Wittgens, Katharina, Keeping, Sam, Mischler, D. and Heudorf, U. (2015) Re-thinking risk communication: information needs of patients, health professionals and the public regarding MRSA – the communicative behaviour of a public health network in Germany responding to the demand for information. Public Health, 131. pp. 56-62. ISSN 0033-3506

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Download (904kB) | Preview
Identification Number: 10.1016/j.puhe.2015.11.012

Abstract

Objectives: Multidrug resistant organisms (MDRO), including Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and health care associated infections (HCAIs) are pressing issues for health care systems across the world. Information and communication are considered key tools for the prevention and management of infectious diseases. Public Health Authorities (PHA) are in a unique position to communicate with health care professionals, patients and the public regarding the health risks. Study design: We used PHA helpdesk interaction data to first ascertain the information requirements of those getting in contact with the service, and secondly to examine the communicative behaviour of the PHA, with a view to improving the quality of communication strategies. Methods: Data on helpdesk interactions between 2010 and 2012 were obtained from a MDRO network of nine German PHAs. 501 recordings were coded and descriptive statistics generated for further qualitative thematic analysis. Results: Our analysis revealed a similar pattern of questions among different groups. Key areas of need for information were around eradication, cleaning and isolation measures. Reported problems were a lack of expert knowledge and continuity of treatment. The helpdesk response was mainly a conversation offering scientific advice, but also included other communication services that went beyond the provision of scientific facts, such as follow-up calls, referral suggestions and consultations on behalf of the caller. These social communication activities seem to have an important impact on the acceptability of public health recommendations and use of the helpdesk.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00333...
Additional Information: © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health
Divisions: LSE Health
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Sets: Research centres and groups > LSE Health
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2016 11:54
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2019 02:46
Projects: 242058, EUCBCC
Funders: Seventh Framework Programme
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/65855

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics