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Knowledge and attitudes as predictors of intentions to seek help for and disclose a mental illness

Rüsch, N., Evans-Lacko, Sara, Henderson, Claire, Flach, C. and Thornicroft, Graham (2011) Knowledge and attitudes as predictors of intentions to seek help for and disclose a mental illness. Psychiatric Services, 62 (6). pp. 675-678. ISSN 1075-2730

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Identification Number: 10.1176/ps.62.6.pss6206_0675

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Individuals often choose not to seek help for or disclose their mental illness. This study examined whether having more positive attitudes and more knowledge about mental illness could predict intentions to seek help from a general practitioner and to disclose a mental illness to friends and family members. METHODS: A Department of Health survey in England assessed knowledge about mental illness, attitudes toward people with mental illness, and level of contact with someone with a mental illness among 1,751 adults representative of the general population. RESULTS: With controls for social grade and race-ethnicity, intentions to seek help were predicted by better knowledge about mental illness, tolerance and support for community care of mental illness, and older age. Willingness to disclose one's mental illness was associated with better knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: Initiatives that increase knowledge and positive attitudes about mental illness among the general population may improve the extent to which individuals seek help for and disclose a mental illness.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2011 American Psychiatric Association
Divisions: Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Sets: Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Date Deposited: 07 Aug 2015 15:39
Last Modified: 20 May 2020 02:27
Funders: Comic Relief, Big Lottery Fund, Shifting Attitudes to Mental Illness (SHiFT), National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Lundbeck UK
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/63031

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