Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Effects of reference pricing in pharmaceutical markets

Galizzi, Matteo M., Ghislandi, Simone and Miraldo, Marisa (2012) Effects of reference pricing in pharmaceutical markets. PharmacoEconomics, 29 (1). pp. 17-33. ISSN 1170-7690

Full text not available from this repository.

Identification Number: 10.2165/11537860-000000000-00000

Abstract

This work aims to provide a systematic and updated survey of original scientific studies on the effect of the introduction of reference pricing (RP) policies in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. We searched PubMed, EconLit and Web of Knowledge for articles on RP. We reviewed studies that met the inclusion criteria established in the search strategy. From a total of 468 references, we selected the 35 that met all of the inclusion criteria. Some common themes emerged in the literature. The first was that RP was generally associated with a decrease in the prices of the drugs subject to the policy. In particular, price drops seem to have been experienced in virtually every country that implemented a generic RP (GRP) policy. A GRP policy applies only to products with expired patents and generic competition, and clusters drugs according to chemical equivalence (same form and active compound). More significant price decreases were observed in the sub-markets in which drugs were already facing generic competition prior to RP. Price drops varied widely according to the amount of generic competition and industrial strategies: brand-named drugs originally priced above RP values decreased their prices to a greater extent. A second common theme was that both therapeutic RP (TRP) and GRP have been associated with significant and consistent savings in the first years of application. A third general result is that generic market shares significantly increased whenever the firms producing brand-named drugs did not adopt one of the following strategies: lowering prices to RP values; launching new dosages and/or formulations; or marketing substitute drugs still under patent protection. Finally, concerning TRP, although more evidence is needed, studies based on a large number of patient-level observations showed no association between the RP policy and health outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://link.springer.com/journal/40273
Additional Information: © 2011 Springer
Divisions: Social Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Research centres and groups > LSE Health and Social Care
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2015 15:30
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2020 01:41
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/61007

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item