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What childhood characteristics predict psychological resilience to economic shocks in adulthood?

Powdthavee, Nattavudh (2014) What childhood characteristics predict psychological resilience to economic shocks in adulthood? Journal of Economic Psychology, 45. pp. 84-101. ISSN 0167-4870

Full text not available from this repository.
Identification Number: 10.1016/j.joep.2014.08.003

Abstract

This paper investigates whether people’s psychological resilience to one of the most important economic shocks – job loss – can be predicted using early childhood characteristics. Using a longitudinal data that tracked almost 3000 children into adulthood, we showed that the negative effect of unemployment on mental well-being and life satisfaction is significantly larger for workers who, as adolescents, had a relatively poor father-child relationship. Maternal unemployment, on the other hand, is a good predictor of how individuals react psychologically to future unemployment. Although the results should be viewed as illustrative and more research is needed, the current article provides new longitudinal evidence that psychological resilience to job loss may be determined early on in the life cycle.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/01674870
Additional Information: © 2014 Elsevier BV.
Divisions: Centre for Economic Performance
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
JEL classification: D - Microeconomics > D0 - General > D00 - General
I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I19 - Other
J - Labor and Demographic Economics > J6 - Mobility, Unemployment, and Vacancies > J64 - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
Sets: Research centres and groups > Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2014 09:42
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2019 19:41
Projects: Grant No R01AG040640
Funders: UK Department of Work and Pensions, U.S. National Institute of Aging
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/60141

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